MIT Press Playful Thinking Series    
 

About Playful Thinking

The Playful Thinking series from MIT Press publishes engaging and visually compelling volumes on game-related topics, authored by both scholars and industry luminaries, that are easily accessible to academics, professionals, and laymen from a broad range of backgrounds and levels of experience.

Each volume ranges between 25,000-30,000 words (approximately 100 pages) in length, is small enough to be easily thrown in a backpack or a coat pocket, and is written in a way that is accessible and compelling to academics, professionals, and educated readers in general.

The series' focus can be summed up as follows:

  • Each volume focuses on an innovative and clearly demarcated issue concerning video games.
  • Each volume has a hook and theme that is relevant to readers outside video game studies.
  • The prototypical volume discusses video games and x, applying insights from other fields to video games, and reflecting upon what this combination yields in terms of more general insights.
  • Short form, roughly 25,000-30,000 words.

Sample topics may include video games and art, video games and architecture, video games and music, the history of video games, video games and fairy tales, etc.


History

The Playful Thinking Series was sparked by discussions and research being conducted at the MIT Game Lab (then the Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab), a research group at the MIT Comparative Media Studies program.

Current Books

   
   

Uncertainty in Games

by Greg Costikyan

In life, uncertainty surrounds us. Things that we thought were good for us turn out to be bad for us (and vice versa); people we thought we knew well behave in mysterious ways; the stock market takes a nosedive. Thanks to an inexplicable optimism, most of the time we are fairly cheerful about it all. But we do devote much effort to managing and ameliorating uncertainty. Is it any wonder, then, asks Greg Costikyan, that we have taken this aspect of our lives and transformed it culturally, making a series of elaborate constructs that subject us to uncertainty but in a fictive and nonthreatening way? That is: we create games.

In this concise and entertaining book, Costikyan, an award-winning game designer, argues that games require uncertainty to hold our interest, and that the struggle to master uncertainty is central to their appeal. Game designers, he suggests, can harness the idea of uncertainty to guide their work.

Costikyan explores the many sources of uncertainty in many sorts of games – from Super Mario Bros. to Rock/Paper/Scissors, from Monopoly to CityVille, from FPS Deathmatch play to Chess. He describes types of uncertainty, including performative uncertainty, analytic complexity, and narrative anticipation. And he suggests ways that game designers who want to craft novel game experiences can use an understanding of game uncertainty in its many forms to improve their designs.

About the Author
Greg Costikyan, an award-winning designer of board, tabletop, roleplaying, computer, online, mobile, and social games, is Senior Designer at Disney Playdom's Dream Castle Studio. He is the author of four science fiction/fantasy novels.

More at MIT Press

 



Uncertainty in Games by Greg Costikyan

Hardcover | $19.95 Trade | 13.95 | ISBN: 9780262018968 | 136 pp. | 5.375 x 8 in | March 2013

   

The Art of Failure

by Jesper Juul

We may think of video games as being "fun," but in The Art of Failure, Jesper Juul claims that this is almost entirely mistaken. When we play video games, our facial expressions are rarely those of happiness or bliss. Instead, we frown, grimace, and shout in frustration as we lose, or die, or fail to advance to the next level. Humans may have a fundamental desire to succeed and feel competent, but game players choose to engage in an activity in which they are nearly certain to fail and feel incompetent. So why do we play video games even though they make us unhappy? Juul examines this paradox.

In video games, as in tragic works of art, literature, theater, and cinema, it seems that we want to experience unpleasantness even if we also dislike it. Reader or audience reaction to tragedy is often explained as catharsis, as a purging of negative emotions. But, Juul points out, this doesn't seem to be the case for video game players. Games do not purge us of unpleasant emotions; they produce them in the first place. What, then, does failure in video game playing do?

Juul argues that failure in a game is unique in that when you fail in a game, you (not a character) are in some way inadequate. Yet games also motivate us to play more, in order to escape that inadequacy, and the feeling of escaping failure (often by improving skills) is a central enjoyment of games. Games, writes Juul, are the art of failure: the singular art form that sets us up for failure and allows us to experience it and experiment with it.

The Art of Failure is essential reading for anyone interested in video games, whether as entertainment, art, or education.

About the Author
Jesper Juul is Assistant Professor at the New York University Game Center. He is the author of Half-Real: Video Games between Real Rules and Fictional Worlds and A Casual Revolution: Reinventing Video Games and Their Players, both published by the MIT Press.

More at MIT Press

 



Uncertainty in Games by Greg Costikyan

Hardcover | $19.95 Trade | 13.95 | ISBN: 9780262019057 | 168 pp. | 5.375 x 8 in | 54 b&w illus.| February 2013

   

Submissions

The editors are currently accepting book proposals. The proposal submission process is as follows:

  1. Author discusses idea with editors.
  2. Author prepares book proposal including sample chapters.
  3. Book proposal is submitted to the editors and passed on to anonymous peer review.

To begin the proposal process, please contact the editors at proposals AT playfulthinking DOT net.

Series Editors

   

Jesper Juul

 

Jesper Juul

Jesper Juul is Assistant Professor at the New York University Game Center. He is the author of Half-Real: Video Games between Real Rules and Fictional Worlds and A Casual Revolution: Reinventing Video Games and Their Players, both published by the MIT Press.

   

Geoffrey Long

 

Geoffrey Long

Geoffrey Long is a media analyst, scholar, and storyteller currently exploring transmedia experiences, emerging entertainment platforms and the future of entertainment with the Narrative Design Team at Microsoft Studios. He is an alum of the MIT Comparative Media Studies program and a FoE Fellow with the Futures of Entertainment community.

   

William Uricchio

 

William Uricchio

William Uricchio is Professor and Director of the MIT Comparative Media Studies Program and Professor of Comparative Media History at Utrecht University in the Netherlands, where he considers the interplay of media technologies and cultural practices, and their role in (re-) constructing representation, knowledge and publics. He is Principal Investigator of the MIT Game Lab and of the MIT Open Documentary Lab.